How many years of smoking causes Mouth Cancer

SMOKING causes Mouth Cancer

“Smoking: A Risky Habit That Could Cost You Your Life”

Mouth cancer, also known as Oral Cancer, is a type of cancer that affects the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, the sinuses, and pharynx.

It is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that can cause disfigurement and disability.

Latest Research Findings on How Many Years of Smoking Causes Mouth Cancer

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that smoking is responsible for around 70% of all mouth cancer cases. A study conducted in the United Kingdom found that smokers who had smoked for more than 20 years were more than twice as likely to develop mouth cancer than those who had smoked for less than 10 years.

Another study conducted in the United States found that smokers who had smoked for more than 30 years were more than four times as likely to develop mouth cancer than those who had smoked for less than 10 years.

The risk of developing mouth cancer increases with the number of cigarettes smoked per day. A study conducted in the United Kingdom found that smokers who smoked more than 20 cigarettes per day were more than three times as likely to develop mouth cancer than those who smoked fewer than 10 cigarettes per day.

Overall, the research indicates that the longer a person smokes, the greater their risk of developing mouth cancer. 

Signs & Symptoms of Mouth Cancer

Smoking is a major risk factor for developing mouth cancer. Signs and symptoms of mouth cancer caused by smoking may include:

• A sore or irritation in the mouth that does not heal
• A lump or thickening in the cheek
• White or red patches in the mouth
• Unusual bleeding, pain, or numbness in the mouth
• A sore throat or feeling that something is caught in the throat
• Difficulty chewing or swallowing
• Loose teeth
• A change in the way the dentures fit
• A change in the voice
• Swelling of the jaw
• Unexplained weight loss
• Ear pain
• A lump in the neck
• A persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth
• A persistent sore on the lip or in the mouth

Smoking Increases the Risk 

Smoking is a major risk factor for developing mouth cancer. According to the World Health Organization, tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death globally.

Studies have shown that smokers are six times more likely to develop mouth cancer than non-smokers.

The smoke from cigarettes contains more than 7,000 chemicals, many of which are known to be carcinogenic. These chemicals can damage the cells in the mouth, leading to cancer.

Smoking can cause inflammation in the mouth, which can lead to the development of cancerous cells.

Smoking can reduce the body’s ability to fight off infections, which can increase the risk of developing mouth cancer.

In addition to smoking, other risk factors for developing mouth cancer include excessive alcohol consumption, a diet low in fruits and vegetables, and a family history of the disease.

It is important to note that even if you do not smoke, you can still be at risk for developing mouth cancer. If you are a smoker, quit as soon as possible. 

Quitting Smoking Reduces the Risk

Quitting smoking can significantly reduce the risk of developing this potentially deadly disease.

Quitting smoking is not easy, but there are many resources available to help. The American Cancer Society recommends talking to your doctor about medications and other treatments that can help you quit. Many online resources and support groups can provide advice and support.

Other Risk Factors for Developing Mouth Cancer

There are several risk factors associated with developing mouth cancer. These include:

1. Tobacco Use: Smoking cigarettes, cigars, and pipes, as well as using smokeless tobacco, such as snuff or chewing tobacco, increases the risk of developing mouth cancer.

2. Alcohol Use: Excessive alcohol consumption is a major risk factor for developing mouth cancer.

3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV): HPV is a virus that can be transmitted through sexual contact. It is linked to an increased risk of developing mouth cancer.

4. Age: The risk of developing mouth cancer increases with age.

5. Gender: Men are more likely to develop mouth cancer than women.

6. Sun Exposure: Prolonged exposure to the sun can increase the risk of developing lip cancer.

7. Poor Oral Hygiene: Poor oral hygiene can increase the risk of developing mouth cancer.

8. Diet: A diet low in fruits and vegetables can increase the risk of developing mouth cancer.

9. Genetics: Certain genetic mutations can increase the risk of developing mouth cancer.

Be aware of the risk factors for developing mouth cancer and take steps to reduce your risk. 

Treatment for Oral Cancer

Treatment options for mouth/oral cancer caused by smoking vary depending on the stage and severity of the cancer.

Common treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

In addition to these treatments, lifestyle changes can also help improve the prognosis of mouth cancer caused by smoking.

Quitting smoking is the most important lifestyle change that can be made. Eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and avoiding alcohol and other substances can also help improve the prognosis of mouth cancer caused by smoking.

Let us watch how to do Self-mouth examination for Oral Cancer

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Reviewed By : Dr. Aviral Vatsa

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